guns

(AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

Some Illinois gun dealers say the lack of guidelines governing them under a new state law that requires them to obtain a state license and implement a variety of security procedures is driving them out of business or across state lines. 

A civil lawsuit against the father of the man accused of fatally shooting four people at a Waffle House in Nashville last year is moving forward.

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CHICAGO - Chicago has agreed to require that officers file paperwork each time they point a gun at someone, even if they don't fire.

     

CHICAGO (AP) - The Illinois attorney general's office might be looking to a federal judge to decide whether Chicago police officers should record each time they point a gun at someone.

Gov. Bruce Rauner has signed a law allowing courts to take weapons away from people who pose a threat of violence to themselves or others.

The Illinois House has approved legislation to create a procedure to temporarily confiscate guns from people threatening violence.

His name was Devon McClyde, and he was 16 years old when he was caught in the crossfire of an argument while playing basketball one evening in a local park in Danville on June 8, 2016.

He died three days later – the victim of another gun crime in Central Illinois.

 


Daniel Baker / Illinois Public Media

A student-organized town hall on gun violence brought out a crowd of more than 100 people to the Champaign Public Library Thursday. The event was hosted by students from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and five area high schools.

Abby Weber urged the crowd to contact their lawmakers to pass stricter gun control measures at the state and local level. The U of I freshman says a single law won’t curb gun violence. She says it will take a bigger effort, and students won’t give up on the cause. 

A suburban gun range in Illinois that's offering free concealed carry classes for teachers says training slots are filling up quickly.

The Illinois Senate has adopted a ban on bump stocks, an age limit to own assault-style weapons and an extended waiting period for delivery of high-capacity weapons.

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Big changes to Illinois' gun laws don't happen often. But a growing movement across the country appears to be resonating in the state's General Assembly.
 

Hundreds rallied outside the statehouse calling for stricter gun control. Several in attendance had lost loved ones to gun violence. They wore pins showing the faces of the deceased.

Mary Kay Mace lost her daughter when a gunman opened fire in a Northern Illinois University classroom. The recent high school shooting in Florida happened on the 10th anniversary of her daughter's death.

The Illinois Supreme Court has ruled that a state law banning guns within 1,000 feet of public park violates a Second Amendment right to self-defense.

Chicago Police say they made dozens of arrests after infiltrating an invitation-only group on Facebook where they bought purchased guns and drugs. 

Democratic Sen. Tammy Duckworth of Illinois is backing an effort to expand background checks for firearms.

Springfield businesses and a union have committed $35,000 to fund a summer jobs program for youth in an effort to address a spike in violence. Mayor Jim Langfelder announced the initiative. He was joined by at least three-dozen local elected officials along with community leaders, businesses and labor union representatives.

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The appetite for legal firearms is on the rise in Chicago, even as demand appears to wane nationally.  Illinois State Police say the number of firearm owner identification applications in Chicago doubled from about 19,600 in 2014 to nearly 39,000 last year.  It's on pace to surpass that this year.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel says the dragging of a dentist off a United Airlines flight by airport security officers show they shouldn't be allowed to carry guns.  Cellphone video of the incident sparked widespread outrage.  Emanuel called what happened to Dr. David Dao totally, all-around unacceptable.

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SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) - Illinois Democrats are advancing plans preventing people with mental illnesses from legally owning firearms.

The plans target state gun owner's identification cards, which allow people to possess firearms. The bills are up for consideration this month by the House and Senate chambers. 

Shootist Convention Comes to Davenport

Mar 8, 2016

The wild west will come to the Quad Cities this week. The National Congress of Old West Shootists (NCOWS) will hold its annual convention in Davenport Thursday through Sunday. 

President Barack Obama is continuing to make his case that more needs to be done to curb gun violence. This week he outlined a series of executive steps that includes broader background checks. Gun-friendly states like Indiana have long resisted those measures. But some gun owners there agree more could be done. Illinois Public Radio's Michael Puente reports.

One of the executive actions President Obama is pushing would tighten the so-called “gun show loophole.” That’s where private sellers are not required to conduct a background check.

     OBAMA: Anybody in the business of selling firearms must get a license and conduct background checks or be subject to criminal prosecutions. It doesn’t matter whether you’re doing it over the internet or at a gun show.

Gun shows are big business in the Hoosier state. You can find one happening nearly every month in Northwest Indiana. Crown Point hosted one in December at the Lake County Fairgrounds. That’s where I run into Nick, a Schererville resident who declined to give his last name.

     MIKE: Do these gun shows get a bad rap? Some say it's easier to get guns here.

     NICK: Here’s why it’s easier. You have actually people from gun shops who have tables in there. They have your form that you fill out for the ATF and they call in your background check to the NCIS immediately. The only way to get it without is if it’s a private seller. That’s your loophole.

Nick isn’t sure closing that loophole will make much of a difference.

     NICKLook at the gangbangers in Chicago. Do you think they all have carry cards? No. We need more laws? No you don’t. You need to enforce the laws you have.

But those in favor of universal background checks say that law doesn’t exist.

     BUNCICH: There are individuals at these gun shows that are skirting the law. They are called private dealers.

That’s John Buncich, the sheriff of Lake County. His office is just down the road from the gun show.

     BUNCICH: And also, what we found is that in the parking lots of a lot of these gun shows, individuals will conduct illegal sales.

Law enforcement officials say many of those guns end up on the streets of Chicago and contribute to violence.

Mike Saechang / Flickr/Creative Commons

 

CHICAGO (AP) - An Illinois lawmaker has filed legislation aimed at keeping dangerous mentally ill people and anyone convicted of felonies or domestic violence from having guns.

Rep. Greg Harris' bill also would ban people on the FBI's terrorist watch list from getting firearms. 

The Chicago Democrat says not letting people who are severely mentally ill or on the terror watch list own weapons "just makes sense." 

Village reaches $185K settlement with gun collector

Jul 22, 2015
Jimmy Smith / Flickr

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Ill. (AP) - An Arlington Heights man will receive $10,000 in a settlement with the village over the seizure of three antique firearms. The lawsuit was settled out of court for $185,000 and approved Monday by Arlington Heights. But the Daily Herald reports that $175,000 of the settlement will go to Art Lovi's attorneys.

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Illinois hunters and outdoors enthusiasts see Gov. Bruce Rauner as a potential new ally in Springfield as they advocate for a number of pieces of legislation this year.  

Chicago is struggling to bring down deadly gun violence. As part of that, Mayor Rahm Emanuel has been pushing three-year mandatory minimum sentences for anyone caught carrying an illegal firearm. He wants state lawmakers to take up a bill to that effect when they go back to Springfield this week. The mayor says he doesn’t want more parents to lose children to gun violence, but research shows there’s a much better way he could help. Illinois Public Radio’s Robert Wildeboer explains.

30 criminal justice experts and practitioners in Illinois have signed onto a research memo opposing mandatory minimum sentences for gun crimes. 

House to consider concealed-carry legislation

May 24, 2013

A measure that would allow Illinois residents to carry concealed firearms is heading to the House floor after lawmakers approved it in committee Thursday. The legislation prohibits concealed-carry in many public places, like public transit, sports arenas, schools, and street festivals. Some of these have been sticking points for gun-rights advocates, who would prefer universal carry.

Concealed carry plan fails in the House

Apr 19, 2013

The Illinois House Thursday night voted down a concealed carry plan backed by gun-rights activists. Legislators are under a court order to pass a law by early June that will allow people to carry guns in public.

House votes down another measure dealing with firearms

Apr 19, 2013

The Illinois House Thursday rejected yet another piece of legislation dealing with firearms. This one would have forced the state's pension systems to get rid of investments in companies that make guns or ammunition. Representative Chad Hays, Republican from Danville, wondered where the hunt to stop investing in troubling products would end.

Durbin learns about Peoria’s Don’t Shoot program

Apr 2, 2013

  U.S. Senator Dick Durbin met with area law enforcement officials to learn about Peoria's anti-violence initiative.   The Don't Shoot program is based on the book by David Kennedy and addresses ways the community and law enforcement can reduce violent crime. Peoria Police Chief Steve Settingsgaard says shootings are down 26-percent since January compared to the same time last year.

Counties focus on mental illness, gun access

Mar 7, 2013

More Illinois counties are complying with a law intended to keep guns away from people with mental illness. IPR’s Chris Slaby reports: 

 An audit last year found only three county court clerks reported people with "disqualifying mental health conditions" to the Illinois State Police.  Now, that number's up to 27.  Jessica Tramme is chief of the firearm services bureau for the Illinois State Police.She says a change in January means judges MUST order court clerks to notify the State Police when people are found "mental defective" or "intellectually disabled."

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