E.D. Edwards plant

Tim Shelley / WCBU

Sixteen Central Illinois organizations will benefit from an $8.6 million settlement paid out by the owners of the closing E.D. Edwards coal power plant near Bartonville.

Illinois Sierra Club

A federal judge has approved a consent decree to close the E.D. Edwards power plant by the end of 2022. 

weak_hope / Flickr/Creative Commons

Four Central Illinois coal plants and a southern Illinois coal mine are slated to close by year’s end.

Environmental advocates say the Clean Energy Jobs Act would create new programs to help workers and communities impacted by the coal facility closures. And they say movement on the legislation is needed now. 

Gov. J.B. Pritzker said earlier this month he does not expect action on the legislation during this year’s veto session. 

But State Rep. Rita Mayfield (D-Waukegan) says that is unacceptable. 

Illinois Sierra Club

A coalition of environmental groups and the owners of the E.D. Edwards coal-burning power plant have filed a consent decree in federal court that would close the plant by the end of 2022.

The decree was jointly filed in the Central District of Illinois in Peoria on Tuesday. It was first announced by Illinois Power Resources Generating and the environmental groups led by the Natural Resources Defense Council last month. 

WCBU

The E.D. Edwards coal power plant in Bartonville would close in 2022 as part of the settlement of a 2013 lawsuit filed by several environmental groups. 

The Clean Air Act lawsuit was filed by the Natural Resources Defenses Council, Sierra Club, and Respiratory Health Association. The suit alleged the Bartonville plant repeatedly violated opacity standards for smoke, particularite matter limits, and federal reporting requirements. 

Tim Shelley / WCBU

A small but vocal group of local residents came out Tuesday to offer their input to the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency on new coal ash regulations.

WCBU

Environmentalists are blasting Vistra Energy’s coal-burning power plant closure announcement as a cynical cost-cutting move. 

weak_hope / Flickr/Creative Commons

An environmental advocate says the new Illinois coal ash pollution law comes at a good time. 

lady_lbrty / Flickr/Creative Commons

Members of the Central Illinois Healthy Community Alliance and Illinois People’s Action are renewing their call for environmental justice and a transition to clean energy in the greater Peoria area.  

Dynegy recently announced plans to shut down five units split between its Baldwin and Newton Plants.

Tracey Fox is with the Health Communities Alliance. She says burning less coal is a step forward for the state. But Fox says  the economics used to decide the plant closures was one-sided in the fact that they are also some of the least polluting.

At least one government entity is listening to environmental groups’ calls for leaders to demand more information from Dynegy. The Peoria City/County Health Department is sending a letter to the company asking about its future plans for the E.D Edwards plant that’s located outside Peoria.

A collaboration of environmental groups is calling on elected officials to demand Dynegy disclose its intentions for a local coal-fired power plant.