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Mayor Ardis Calls On Peorians To Take Stand Against Violence

PEORIA -- Peoria Mayor Jim Ardis said police and city leaders need the community to help stand up against violence.

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Illinois Abortion Rights Groups Say Parental Notification Is Next

As Illinois abortion rights groups celebrated Wednesday's signing of the Reproductive Health Act, they’ve already got their eyes on what’s next: repealing a state law known as the Parental Notification Act. Listen to a summary of the story.

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Why Air Ambulance Bills Are Still Sky-High

In April 2018, 9-year-old Christian Bolling was hiking with his parents and sister in Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains, near their home in Roanoke. While climbing some boulders, he lost his footing and fell down a rocky 20-foot drop, fracturing both bones in his lower left leg, his wrist, both sides of his nose and his skull. A rescue squad carried him out of the woods, and a helicopter flew him to a pediatric hospital trauma unit in Roanoke. Most of Christian's care was covered by his parents...

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Community Events Calendar

Find out about events across central Illinois with Peoria Public Radio's community events calendar

A former Guatemalan first lady leads early counting in Sunday's presidential election in the Central American country, where the electorate is hoping to find a candidate who can tackle its high unemployment, violence and corruption.

Sandra Torres, a 64-year-old businesswoman, was leading with 24% of the vote, followed by four-time presidential candidate Alejandro Giammattei, 63, a former director of the country's prison system, with 15%, according to The Associated Press. A runoff election is expected.

Spinal surgery made it possible for Liv Cannon to plant her first vegetable garden.

"It's a lot of bending over and lifting the wheelbarrow and putting stakes in the ground," the 26-year-old says as she surveys the tomatillos, cherry tomatoes and eggplants growing in raised beds behind her house in Austin, Texas. "And none of that I could ever do before."

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., says one of his "highest priorities" is to take on the leading cause of preventable death in the United States: smoking.

McConnell has sponsored a bill, along with Virginia Democratic Sen. Tim Kaine, that would increase the tobacco purchase age from 18 to 21.

The far-right Alternative for Germany (AfD) party has lost its first mayoral contest, handing embattled Chancellor Angela Merkel's center-right Christian Democratic Union (CDU) a solid victory.

In the small eastern town of Görlitz, near the border with Poland, Octavian Ursu, a 51-year-old Romanian immigrant and classical musician, easily won Sunday's runoff vote against AfD's Sebastian Wippel, 36, who stood on an anti-immigrant platform.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo doubled down Sunday on the claim that Iran was responsible for attacks on two tankers traveling in the Strait of Hormuz, despite furnishing no new evidence beyond a video distributed last week by the Pentagon.

Exactly two months to the day after a fire blazed through the roof and spire of Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, the church held its first Mass on Saturday.

Instead of his traditional miter hat, the archbishop of Paris wore a white, hard hat, along with about 30 others in attendance.

The Mass was closed to the public for security reasons, and those there were mostly clergy and people who work on the site.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We're going to stay in Hong Kong a little longer to hear from one of the protesters who was out in the streets all day. Galileo Cheng is a social affairs executive for the Hong Kong Catholic Institution Staff Association, and he is with us now.

Welcome. Thanks for talking to us.

GALILEO CHENG: Yes. Thank you.

MARTIN: The government says that they've shelved this bill for now. Why is it that so many people still felt they needed to come out to protest?

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We're going to stay in Hong Kong a little longer to hear from one of the protesters who was out in the streets all day. Galileo Cheng is a social affairs executive for the Hong Kong Catholic Institution Staff Association, and he is with us now.

Welcome. Thanks for talking to us.

GALILEO CHENG: Yes. Thank you.

MARTIN: The government says that they've shelved this bill for now. Why is it that so many people still felt they needed to come out to protest?

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