Clarifying 'Consent' In The Era Of #MeToo

In the wake of the #metoo movement and the spotlight on assault allegations againstJudge Brett Kavanaugh, more states — including Illinois — are rethinking how sex education should be taught in public schools.

Read More

Illinois EPA Calls On Attorney General to Shut Down Sterigenics Willowbrook Plant

The Illinois Environmental Protection Agency is asking the Attorney General’s office to temporarily shut down a Chicago-area chemical plant. The agency says that plant is releasing an illegal amount of cancer-causing fumes into the air. Listen to a summary of the story. The plant, owned by medical company Sterigenics, uses a chemical called ethylene oxide to sterilize medical equipment. A recent federal report showed long term exposure to that chemical is known to cause cancer, and the...

Read More

Why Are Black Women Less Likely To Stick With A Breast Cancer Follow-Up Treatment?

When she was in graduate school for public health, Niasha Fray found a job she loved: counseling women with breast cancer about sticking to their treatment. She offered what's called "motivational interviewing," a type of therapy intended to help women overcome obstacles keeping them from taking their medications — which can have unpleasant side effects "They had just given up so much of their lives, so much of their bodies, so much of their family," Fray says. "They wanted to get back to...

Read More

A time traveler solves history's greatest mysteries!

An interactive comedy murder mystery on October 20, 2018

Traffic

Community Events Calendar

Find out about events across central Illinois with Peoria Public Radio's community events calendar

Lara Alqasem, a 22-year-old Florida native, landed at Israel's Ben-Gurion Airport last Tuesday, expecting to start her studies in human rights at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Instead, she has spent the past week detained.

Alqasem, whose father is of Palestinian heritage, was barred from entering the country and accused of supporting a boycott of Israel that was started by Palestinian leaders.

Passwords that took seconds to guess, or were never changed from their factory settings. Cyber vulnerabilities that were known, but never fixed. Those are two common problems plaguing some of the Department of Defense's newest weapons systems, according to the Government Accountability Office.

The flaws are highlighted in a new GAO report, which found the Pentagon is "just beginning to grapple" with the scale of vulnerabilities in its weapons systems.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goodbye, Google+ — We Forgot You Existed

16 hours ago

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Updated 10:33 p.m. ET

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has temporarily blocked lower court orders for depositions by two senior Trump administration officials in the multiple lawsuits over the new question about U.S. citizenship status on the 2020 census.

Imagine a small, developing nation whose education system is severely lacking: schools are poorly funded, students can't afford tuition or books, fewer than half of indigenous girls even attend school — and often drop out to take care of siblings or get married.

These are the schools of rural Guatemala.

Now meet a firebrand educator who thinks he has a way to reinvent schools in Guatemala.

His school is called Los Patojos, a Spanish word used in Guatemala that means "little ones."

Copyright 2018 Nashville Public Radio. To see more, visit Nashville Public Radio.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

It's been a year since the The New York Times ran an exposé alleging sexual harassment by Hollywood executive Harvey Weinstein. That led to an outpouring of allegations as others spoke out, leading to the downfall of many leaders and executives, including top news editors at NPR.

Pages