High Court Won't Take Case of Ex-Illinois Rep. Aaron Schock

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Supreme Court is declining to get involved in the corruption case against former Illinois congressman Aaron Schock.

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State Week: Minimum Wage Going Up, Pension Payments Going Down

Democrats in the Illinois House approved an increase in the state minimum wage. Assuming Gov. J.B. Pritzker signs the legislation — he's said he will — the rate will gradually climb to $15 perhour in the year 2025;

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Karl Lagerfeld Dies; A High Priest Of High Fashion

Karl Lagerfeld, the German designer who was the artistic director of Chanel and Fendi and also created his own brand, has died in Paris. For years, Lagerfeld sought to obscure his age; he was reportedly 85. Lagerfeld worked with some of fashion's biggest design houses, showing a knack for reinventing classic styles with innovative flourishes. In the process, he brought Fendi to new heights in the 1960s and revamped Chanel after being named that brand's director in the 1980s. Chanel announced...

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Community Events Calendar

Find out about events across central Illinois with Peoria Public Radio's community events calendar

In March, country music star Jason Aldean is playing Madison Square Garden. Tickets sold out in 10 minutes. Fans want to hear his latest No. 1 song, "Take a Little Ride."

Headlines were circulating last week about how, as Slate put it, "almost everybody" is rooting for the San Francisco 49ers over the Baltimore Ravens in Sunday's Super Bowl. Of course, it turns out that what this actually meant was more like "substantially more than half of the area of the country is included within counties in which more people like the 49ers on Facebook than like the Ravens on Facebook."

In response to the growing concern over China's air pollution, a theatrical Chinese entrepreneur is selling cans of fresh air.

Sure, you can go to a Super Bowl party and be That Guy. The one who gleefully lectures the crowd on the merits of running the inverted veer out of the pistol in order to freeze the weak-side backer.

In Afghanistan, there was no sound of music when the Taliban ruled from 1996 to 2001. The Islamist militants destroyed music CDs and instruments and even jailed musicians.

Today, there are music schools and young Afghans playing in public. And, this weekend, 48 Afghan boys and girls are traveling to the U.S. to perform at Carnegie Hall and the Kennedy Center.

For more than 40 years, Leon Panetta has split his life on two coasts: his home in California and his work in Washington, D.C. It's a career that included 16 years in Congress, stints as White House chief of staff for President Clinton, and as the head of the CIA and the Pentagon under President Obama.

As Panetta prepares to leave his job as defense secretary, he sat down with Rachel Martin, host of Weekend Edition Sunday, to talk about his years in Washington and serving in the Obama administration.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

Americans seeking stem cell replacement therapy hope the process can heal them of myriad diseases, and a 2011 report by the Baker Institute estimated the industry could bring in $16 billion in revenue by 2020.

The New York Times doesn't mince words when it writes, "Wayne Shorter is generally acknowledged to be jazz's greatest living composer."

A radical left-wing group is calling Friday's attack on the U.S. Embassy in Turkey "an act of self-sacrifice" against the U.S. The suicide bombing killed an embassy guard and injured several others.

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