Illinois Considers Raising Gas Tax, Vehicle Fees

Lawmakers are considering whether to ask Illinoisans to pay more for gasoline — with the money dedicated to fixing crumbling infrastructure. A new proposal at the Statehouse would double the motor fuel tax — from the current 19 cents up to 38 cents a gallon. It would also up driver’s license and vehicle registrations fees, with the goal of raising $2 billion a year to pay for road, bridge, highway and rail improvements. Listen here. State Sen. Martin Sandoval, a Chicago Democrat, views this...

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Statewide: The Debate Over Free Speech At Colleges; Building A Bee Database

When does freedom of speech and academic freedom go too far? The argument is playing out on college campuses across the country, including right here in Illinois. In some cases, it's pitting students against professors and universities. Also, we've been hearing about the decline of the bee population for years. An Illinois graduate student wants to find out what beekeepers are seeing and build a database. That and more on this week's Statewide.

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Analysis: The End Of The 'Caliphate' Doesn't Mean The End Of ISIS

Updated at 6:22 a.m. ET Saturday U.S.-backed forces fighting ISIS remnants announced the capture of the last of the group's remaining territory Saturday. The Syrian Democratic Forces, a Kurdish-led group supported by the U.S., declared a "total elimination of so-called caliphate" and a complete "territorial defeat" of ISIS. "This is a victory for not just us but the whole world," local SDF commander Adnan Afrin told NPR. There are still reports of sporadic gunfire. Afrin characterizes this as...

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This month, one of the big news stories is about parents who bribed and cheated to get their kids into prestigious universities.

And then there's the college admissions story of John Awiel Chol Diing.

Diing, 25, is a former refugee from South Sudan and grew up in U.N.-supported camps in Ethiopia and Kenya. His family couldn't even afford high school fees, let alone college tuition.

But today, thanks to an unlikely series of events, he is a student at Earth University in Costa Rica, finishing up his fourth year studying agricultural science.

Emmet Jopling Bondurant II knew about the civil rights movement when he was a student at the University of Georgia in the 1950s, but he didn't join it.

"I was trying to get through college," the burly, white-haired 82-year-old said in an interview. "And I'm embarrassed to say I was not involved. I should have been involved much sooner."

But, as a 26-year-old lawyer, he soon took part in one of the most important voting rights cases before the Supreme Court in the 1960s — one that ultimately required states to put equal numbers of people in congressional districts.

With the completion of special counsel Robert Muller's investigation into Russian interference into the 2016 presidential election, attention now shifts to Attorney General William Barr, the man who will determine how much of that report to make public — along with what information will be provided to Congress.

Pope Francis has accepted the resignation of one of Chile's top cardinals, who is accused of covering up the sexual abuse of Catholic church members and discrediting victims. 77-year-old Cardinal Ricardo Ezzati was the archbishop of Santiago, Chile's most important archdiocese.

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Next Steps In The Mueller Report

18 hours ago

NPR's Scott Simon talks about the Mueller Report with EmptyWheel.net's Marcy Wheeler, an independent journalist covering national security and civil liberties.

A cruise ship off Norway's western coast was evacuating its 1,300 passengers after losing power and issuing a mayday call on Saturday.

Helicopters and boats were helping with the evacuation, which is expected to continue for many hours, The Associated Press reported.

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