Tanya Koonce / Peoria Public Radio

Peoria Officer Cleared in Shooting of Luis Cruz

The Peoria Police Officer who killed Luis Cruz in July has been cleared of any wrongdoing. Peoria County State’s Attorney Jerry Brady says the officer acted with justifiable and necessary force when he shot 19-year-old Luis Cruz. Brady delivered findings from the State Police investigation Thursday saying the officer was acting to prevent death or great bodily harm to himself or another. Officers Ryan Isonhart and Nicholas Mason were attempting to arrest Cruz for a shooting as well as a...

Read More

Expert Review: More Than A Third Of Prison Deaths Were Preventable

A new report suggests a third of the deaths in Illinois prisons are preventable.

Read More

'What Took A Lifetime To Accumulate ... Was Incinerated In Minutes'

When the sun rose over California on Friday, it found a state substantially changed from just a week ago. A pair of wildfires, both to the north and south, have killed dozens of people, left hundreds more missing and reduced the entire community of Paradise to smoldering ash and ruin. Amid all the destruction, life goes on, albeit substantially changed. For the survivors, rescuers and volunteers involved in recovery efforts — even for people living more than 200 miles from the nearest...

Read More

Traffic

Community Events Calendar

Find out about events across central Illinois with Peoria Public Radio's community events calendar

The message for the migrant caravan was clear from marchers on Sunday in Tijuana, Mexico: We don't want you here.

"We want the caravan to go, they are invading us," said Patricia Reyes, a 62-year-old protester, hiding from the sun under an umbrella. "They should have come into Mexico correctly, legally, but they came in like animals."

A few hundred Tijuanenses gathered in the city's high-end Rio area to protest the groups migrating from Central American countries.

The government of Democratic Republic of the Congo has released a new video in its fight to end the Ebola outbreak there. The message: To avoid contamination with the virus, it helps to wash your hands.

The president is going to pardon a turkey.

Full stop. Insert joke. These things write themselves.

But seriously, it's happening again Tuesday – the peculiar Washington tradition of a president pardoning a Thanksgiving turkey.

After years of motorists blazing through a tiny village in northern Italy, the area's mayor got fed up and installed speed cameras.

And after just two weeks, Acquetico's cameras have caught more than 58,000 speeding incidents, according to Italian media. That's a hefty number for a community of about 120 residents.

In a windowless classroom at the John J. Moran medium-security prison in Cranston, R.I., three men sit around a table to share how and when they began using opioids.

For Josh, now 39, it was when he was just 13 years old. "I got grounded for a week in my house, so I grabbed a bundle of heroin and just sat inside and sniffed it all week."

"I started using heroin at 19," says Ray, now 23. "I was shooting it. It was with a group of friends that I was working with, doing roof work."

Thousands of Guatemalans are evacuating their homes as the Volcán de Fuego, or Volcano of Fire, erupts again near the city of Antigua.

The volcano has erupted repeatedly this year. In June, more than 100 people were killed in a violent eruption that spewed lava, ash and rocks over nearby villages.

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Florida is suing pharmacy chains Walgreens and CVS over their role in what the state calls "unconscionable efforts to increase the demand and supply of opioids into Florida."

State Attorney General Pam Bondi's office announced Friday that it had added the two companies to a lawsuit filed in May against opioid distributors and manufacturers — including OxyContin-maker Purdue Pharma, Percocet-maker Endo Pharmaceuticals and Teva Pharmaceutical, which is one of the world's largest generic-drug manufacturers.

Carlos Ghosn, the powerful chairman of Nissan renowned for reviving the company nearly two decades ago, has been removed from his position after an internal probe found he underreported his income, the company says.

"[N]umerous other significant acts of misconduct have been uncovered, such as personal use of company assets," Nissan wrote in a statement.

As Thanksgiving arrives, Americans will be cooking their favorite holiday bird and debating the best recipes, ideal roasting temperatures and juiciest stuffing. But a team of scientists at Ben-Gurion University in Israel is preparing something different: turkey poop.

They say that when cooked under the right temperature, pressure and other conditions, turkey droppings transform into a form of coal, which can fuel power plants and serve as a renewable resource.

Pages