Vatican Insists U.S. Bishops Put Off Vote On Their Response To Sexual Abuse Crisis

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=soO7RUEyB3U The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops will not be considering two measures it drafted in response to the sexual abuse scandal that has rocked the Catholic Church after the Vatican intervened at the last minute. Announcing the surprise move at the start of the bishops' annual fall assembly, Cardinal Daniel DiNardo said, "At the insistence of the Holy See, we will not be voting" on the changes. "The Holy See has asked that we delay voting," DiNardo...

Read More

Dark Days for Transparency & Shared Governance at WIU

The recording of a closed door meeting held by the Western Illinois University Board of Trustees reveals board members repeatedly violated the Illinois Open Meetings Act (OMA) .

Read More

Counting The Bugs And Bacteria, You're 'Never Home Alone' (And That's OK)

You may be shocked by what's living in your home — the bacteria, the fungi, viruses, parasites and insects. Probably many more organisms than you imagined. "Every surface; every bit of air; every bit of water in your home is alive," says Rob Dunn , a professor of applied ecology at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. "The average house has thousands of species." Dunn started out studying microorganisms and insects in rain forests, but his focus gradually shifted toward backyards and...

Read More

Traffic

Community Events Calendar

Find out about events across central Illinois with Peoria Public Radio's community events calendar

A king, a senator and the "Sultan of Swat" will be honored at the White House Friday.

President Trump is presenting the nation's highest civilian honor to seven people including Elvis Presley and Babe Ruth.

"This is a fascinating way to find out what is important to a president," said Fletcher McClellan, a political scientist at Elizabethtown College in Pennsylvania.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

John Nordeen and Kay Lee served in the same Army platoon during the Vietnam War.

Nordeen and Lee had very different personalities, but in the life-or-death setting of war, the two bonded. Nordeen, a soldier from Seattle, was one of the first people that Lee, a combat medic from San Francisco, talked to.

But after the war, they lost touch.

In 2015, after a years-long search by Nordeen, the veterans finally reconnected.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Miscarriage is "lonely, painful, and demoralizing," Michelle Obama writes in her new memoir. Yet, by some estimates, it ends as many as 1 in 5 pregnancies before the 20-week mark.

The former first lady's disclosure that she and former President Barack Obama suffered from fertility issues, including losing a pregnancy, has sparked conversations about miscarriage, a common but also commonly misunderstood loss.

North Korea says it will deport a U.S. citizen who entered the country illegally from neighboring China last month — a move seen as a conciliatory gesture aimed at maintaining ties with Washington.

North Korea's official KCNA news agency identified the American as Bruce Byron Lowrance and said that he had told his captors that he was controlled by the CIA.

The last two surviving leaders of Cambodia's brutal Khmer Rouge regime of the 1970s were found guilty Friday by an international tribunal on charges of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes.

The conviction of Nuon Chea, 92, the chief lieutenant of the regime's infamous leader, Pol Pot, and Khieu Samphan, 87, the former head of state, is the first official acknowledgement that at least some of the estimated 2 million people who died at the hands of the Khmer Rouge from 1975 to 1979 were victims of an orchestrated genocide.

A plan to repatriate Rohingya refugees to Myanmar from neighboring Bangladesh has stalled, apparently because the refugees were unwilling to go.

Bangladesh has stressed that it will not repatriate anyone against their will. Still, the program sparked protests among some refugees, while others reportedly hid within refugee camps out of fear of being forced to go back.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Peoria Public Radio

Peoria County State's Attorney Jerry Brady has ruled that a Peoria police officer acted in self-defense when he fatally shot a 19-year-old man who fled from a vehicle after a traffic stop.
 
Brady said Thursday he made that decision even though he had doubts about why police chased the car in which Luis Cruz was a passenger. Cruz was wanted in connection with previous shooting and domestic battery incidents and that officers followed him for hours before the July 19 confrontation.
 

Pages